Myanmar traditional medicine formulations and their antioxidant, antiglycation and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities: Potentials for antidiabetes complications


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Authors

  • The Su Moe Ministry of Science and Technology, Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology Research, Kyaukse 05151, Mandalay Division, Myanmar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8640-5716
  • Htet Htet Win Ministry of Science and Technology, Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology Research, Kyaukse 05151, Mandalay Division, Myanmar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0550-166X
  • Zar Kyi Win Ministry of Science and Technology, Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology Research, Kyaukse 05151, Mandalay Division, Myanmar https://orcid.org/0009-0002-8697-0288
  • Nwe Nwe Htay Ministry of Science and Technology, Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology Research, Kyaukse 05151, Mandalay Division, Myanmar https://orcid.org/0009-0002-2392-564X
  • Mya Thida Ministry of Science and Technology, Cell Culture Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology Research, Kyaukse 05151, Mandalay Division, Myanmar https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8036-1599

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29228/ijpbp.37

Keywords:

Myanmar traditional medicine, Formulations, Antioxidant, Antiglycation, Antihyperglycemic, Antidiabetic

Abstract

Myanmar Traditional Medicine (MTM) has been used since ancient times to treat life-threatening diseases like diabetes. In this study, various in vitro assays were used to prove that four MTM formulations were effective at treating diabetes. Antioxidant activities were determined using in vitro DPPH, nitric oxide (NO), and superoxide (SO) radical scavenging assays. The Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to quantify the total phenolic content, while the BSA-fluorescent antiglycation and α-glucosidase inhibitory assays were utilized to determine the antidiabetic activity of MTMs. Among the tested samples, MTM3 showed the best activities for almost all the biological assays tested in this experiment with the % inhibition of 82.89 ± 1.64 for NO and 65.02 ± 2.82 for SO radical scavenging activity, 92.12 ± 1.18 for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and IC50 of 180.29 ± 1.6 µg/ml for the antiglycation activity. It also possessed the highest total phenolic content of 149.41 ± 3.7 mg GAE/g of extract/l among the tested samples. Therefore, the findings suggested that MTM could help diabetic patients improve their quality of life through antioxidant activity against several free radicals and their antiglycation and α-glucosidase inhibitory characteristics.

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Published

04.01.2024

How to Cite

Moe, T. S., Win, H. H., Win, Z. K., Htay, N. N., & Thida, M. (2024). Myanmar traditional medicine formulations and their antioxidant, antiglycation and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities: Potentials for antidiabetes complications. International Journal of Plant Based Pharmaceuticals, 4(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.29228/ijpbp.37

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Section

Research Articles
Received 2023-06-14
Accepted 2023-12-30
Published 2024-01-04